Hanmoodo

Hanmoodo is a Korean-style martial art founded in Finland. It is mainly practiced in the Nordic countries. Hanmoodo contains almost all sectors of traditional martial arts and its exponents may participate in full-contact competition. Han Moo Do should not be confused with the martial art of Han Mu Do.

Han Moo Do was created by Young Suk (8 dan) in 1989, when the first club was established in Kauhava, Finland. In the last few years, it has been spreading to other Nordic countries, such as Sweden, Norway and Denmark.

Hanmoodo is descended from other Korean styles, such as Hoi Jeon Moo Sool and Tae Kwon Do, so Hanmoodo resembles these styles as well as Hapkido in many areas.

Hanmoodo’s techniques include joint-locking techniques, kicks, punches, chokes, throws, takedowns and grappling techniques.

Joint locks mainly target the wrist and elbow but there are also leg locks. Chokes are performed mostly with forearm and wrist. Throws and takedowns resemble Judo and wrestling techniques but are done more elegantly. Kicks are mostly aimed at ribs or head and punches to the abdomen. Punches can be targeted to the body only.

The art contains three weapon styles: nunchaku; long staff (bong) eg. Japanese staff (bo); and sword (gum/kum) (eg. Japanese katana). Hanmoodo exponents are also encouraged to engage in exhibitions where a practiced choreography is presented to an audience. These choreographies feature several practitioners performing self-defence techniques on each other.

Competition Rules: Hanmoodo rules permit kicks above the waistline and punches between the waistline and the head. All strikes must hit the front of the body and other kinds of strikes are prohibited.

Competitors may also grapple by throwing or taking down their opponent and controlling him/her on the mat but striking is prohibited when either competitor has a hold on the other or is considered to be on the ground.

History: Han Mu Do is really an eclectic style of fighting derived largely from Korean Styles, some Japanese techniques and mostly seeks to imitate or reproduce Chinese Internal Arts eg. Baguazhang. Originally Korean it was “created” in America, to emulate styles practiced there. It was not created in Finland.

HanMoodo was concocted from knowledge that He-Young Kimm had accumulated over the last forty years through various teachers and personal experiences. This was not the first name that Dr. Kimm has called this art. The first name, strongly recommended by Suk In-hyuk because this name had been popular in the 1950’s, was Yuj Kwon Sul which means “art of throws and punches.” For a while, it was called Han Mu Yuh Kwon Sul, a name favoured by Ji Han-jae which means the “Korean Martial Art of Throws and Punches”.

Some groups from schools emphasizing Ki training did not like the use of “Mu” because it meant “martial arts” and they considered that the Ki training contained in Han MU Do was more than martial arts training. They simply called it Han Do, which means “way of Korean martial arts.” Finally, in 1991, Kimm decided to call the art Han Mu Do.

Techniques: Joint locks mainly target the wrist and elbow but there are also leg locks. Chokes are performed mostly with forearm and wrist. Throws and takedowns resemble judo and wrestling techniques but are not done elegantly. Kicks are mostly aimed at ribs or head and punches to the abdomen. Kicks include most existing kicks known to mankind which are distinguishly performed from chest with speed and finesse as opposed to, for example, thai-boxing style roundhouse kick employed with a windup motion which results in more power.

Punches are mostly non-existent. The style contains three weapon styles: Archery or some say nunchaku, long staff (bong) eg. Japanese staff (bo) and sword (gum/kum) (eg. Japanese katana). Hanmoodo exponents are also encouraged to engage in exhibitions where a practised choreography is presented to an audience.

Competition rules (exponents of four years or more) Hanmoodo rules permit kicks above waistline and punches between waistline and head. All strikes must hit the front of the body and other kinds of strikes are prohibited.

Competitors may also grapple by throwing or taking down their opponent and controlling him/her on the mat but striking is prohibited when either competitor has a hold on the other or is considered being on the ground. A technical knockout takes place if participant lifts her opponent into the air, for example, with a fireman’s carry. A technical knockout results in victory for the lifter.