Naha Te

Naha-te (那覇手) is a pre-World War II term for a type of martial art indigenous to the area around Naha, the old commercial city of the Ryukyu Kingdom and now the capital city of the island of Okinawa. Well into the 20th century, the martial arts of Okinawa were generally referred to as te, which is Japanese for “hand”. Naha Te is the name of the particular type...

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Isshin Ryu

Isshin-Ryu (一心流) is a style of Okinawan karate founded by Shimabuku Tatsuo and named by him on 15 January 1956. Isshin-RyÅ« karate is largely a synthesis of Shorin-ryu karate, Goju-ryu karate, and Kobudo. The name means, literally, “one heart method.” The style, while not very popular in Okinawa, spread to the United States via the Marines stationed on the...

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Chito Ryu

Chito Ryu (千唐流) is a style of Karate founded by Dr. Chitose Tsuyoshi. As a young man born and raised in Okinawa, Dr. Chitose grew up studying the pre-karate art of Tode (or “To-te”) from many of the top masters of the period. He later moved to mainland Japan to practice medicine, where Chito-ryu evolved as he utilized his modern medical knowledge of anatomy and...

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Yagyu Shingan Ryu

Yagyu Shingan Ryu (柳生心眼流), is a traditional school (koryu) of Japanese martial arts. Different schools of Yagyu Shingan-ryu, that is the Heihojutsu and Taijutsu although related should not be confused and assert different founders, but they all go back to Ushu Tatewaki (羽州 帯刀), referred to in some historical scrolls as Shindo Tatewaki, who taught a...

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Yabusame

Yabusame (流鏑馬) is a type of Japanese archery, one that is performed while riding a horse. The archer shoots a special “turnip-headed” arrow at a wooden target. This style of archery has its origins at the beginning of the Kamakura period. Minamoto no Yoritomo became alarmed at the lack of archery skills his samurai had. He organized yabusame as a form of practice....

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Toyama Ryu

Toyama Ryu (戸山流) is a modern form of iai created by the Imperial Japanese Army in 1925 at the Rikugun Toyama Gakko, or “Toyama Army Academy” in Toyama, Tokyo, Japan. Today, Toyama-ryu is primarily located in the Kanto region. It does not have a single headmaster. Toyama Ryu focuses on practical swordsmanship.  The samurai class was abolished in 1867.  This was...

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Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu

Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu (天真正伝香取神道流) is one of the oldest extant Japanese martial arts, and an exemplar of koryū bujutsu. The Tenshin Shōden Katori Shinto-ryu was founded by Iizasa Ienao, born 1387 in Iizasa village (present day Takomachi, Chiba Prefecture), who was living near Katori Shrine (Sawara City, Chiba Prefecture) at the...

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Taiho Jutsu

Simply defined, Taiho Jutsu means “control and restraining” techniques. Taiho Jutsu was created for the Japanese police force in 1947 and includes the study of “toshu” (unarmed), “keibo” (baton), “seijo” (handcuffing) and “hikitate-oyobi” (forcing a prisoner to their feet). Shudokan Taiho Jutsu system is based upon techniques from...

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Shukokai

Shukokai (修交会) is a group of closely related styles of Karate, based on Tani-ha Shito-ryu, a branch of Shito-ryu developed by Chojiro Tani in the late 1940’s. The first dojo where Tani taught his style was opened in Kobe, Japan in 1946 and named Shuko Kai, meaning the “Way for All” Club. Shukokai was designed around the study of body mechanics, and is famed...

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Shooto

Shooto is a combat sport that is governed by the Shooto Association and the International Shooto Commission. Shooto was originally formed in 1985, as an organization and as a particular fighting system derived from shoot wrestling. Practitioners are referred to as shooters, similarly to practitioners of shootwrestling. Shooto competitions are often considered to be mixed martial arts...

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