Isshin Kempo

Isshin Kempo is a hard/soft, ballistic and standing grappling fighting art founded in 1970 by William Scott Russell (1946-2000) at the pioneering Bank Street School (1962-1984) in Summit, New Jersey (see: The Isshin Kempo Way, Masters Magazine, 2013 Summer issue). The Bank Street Dojo was the birthplace of many significant, first generation, East coast martial art instructors. As a martial art...

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Shingitai Jujitsu

Shingitai Jujitsu is a form of martial arts created by John Saylor. Shingitai Jujitsu was created through Saylor’s study of martial arts. In 1987, Saylor opened his own training center, training people in what would later be called Shingitai Jujitsu. Shingitai Jujitsu combines striking, grappling, and submission moves. To understand Shingitai Jujitsu and its role in the world of ...

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Kokondo

Kokondo Karate and its sister style, Jukido Jujitsu are Japanese-based martial arts developed by Paul Arel. Jukido Jujitsu was founded in 1959 followed by Kokondo Karate in 1970. The two styles are taught and practiced primarily in the United States, Finland and Israel; within the United States, the largest concentration of dojos is near South Windsor, Connecticut, where Arel’s dojo is...

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Toon Ryu

Toon Ryu (東恩流), is a style of Okinawan Karate taught and named by Kyoda Juhatsu. Kyoda Juhatsu ( Juhatsu Kyoda December 5, 1887 – August 31, 1968 )) entered the dojo of Higaonna Kanryo in 1902 and continued studying with Higaonna until his death in 1915. One month after Kyoda started, Miyagi Chojun (founder of Goju-ryu) entered the dojo. In 1908, Kenwa Mabuni ( founder of...

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Tomari Te

Tomari Te (泊手) refers to a tradition of martial arts originating from the village of Tomari, Okinawa. Based on an underground empty-handed fighting style native to Okinawa, Tomari-te arose largely through the influence of Chinese diplomats and other personages skilled in Quan fa, such as Wang Ji, Anan, and Ason, in the late 17th century. Along with Naha-te and Shuri-te, Tomari-te...

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Tegumi

Tegumi is a traditional form of wrestling from Okinawa. According to Shoshin Nagamine, in his “Tales of Okinawa’s Great Masters”, there are no accurate historical documents surrounding the origins of grappling in Okinawa. Like most other forms of wrestling it seems that tegumi evolved from a primitive form of grappling self defense, which was constantly being adapted and...

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Shuri Te

Shuri-te (首里手) is a pre-World War II term for a type of martial art indigenous to the area around Shuri, the old capital city of the Ryukyu Kingdom. Shuri-Te is the name of the particular type of Okinawan martial art that developed in the Shuri, the ancient capital of Okinawa. One of the early Okinawan masters, To-De Sakugawa (1733-1815) is credited as being one of the initial...

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Shorin Ryu

Shorin-ryu (小林流) is one of the major modern Okinawan martial arts. Said to have been founded by Sokon Matsumura during the 1800s, Shorin-ryu combines elements of the traditional Okinawan fighting styles Shuri-te and Tomari-te. Shorin-ryu is widely considered to be one of the two major modern styles of Okinawan karate, along with Goju-ryu, which is rooted in the other traditional...

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Ryuei Ryu

Ryuei-ryu (劉衛流) is an Okinawan style of karate. It was originally a closely-guarded family style of the Nakaima family of Naha and is now one of the internationally recognized Okinawan karate styles. It is practiced in the United States, Argentina, Venezuela, Europe, and Okinawa. This style of karate was first introduced to Okinawa around 1875 by Norisato Nakaima. Born of...

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Ryu Te

Ryu-te (琉手 “flow of the hand”) is a traditional form of karate from the Ryukyu Islands, which are located southwest of Japan. RyÅ«-te emphasizes effective self-defense; its techniques aim to take control of an opponent while avoiding the use of excessive force that threatens to injure or maim. Neither a sport nor a form of exercise, RyÅ«-te is a method of...

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